How the liberal arts help make students Loyola Ready

By Jim Dickinson, Ph.D., ’01

Three core elements of the Ignatian pedagogy for learning are experience, reflection, and action.

It’s difficult to imagine a better process for discovering one’s own purpose in life and career than the teachings St. Ignatius shared with the world 500 years ago.

Applying this paradigm to one’s career path often requires committing to a lengthy but important examination of self and the world that will ultimately lead to satisfaction, fulfillment, and meaning.

Each fall, nearly 40 percent of the first-year class arrives on campus without a declared path, poised to begin a time of discernment and discovery.

The Jesuit, liberal arts foundation that is integral to a Loyola education helps students define their reason for getting up in the morning, matching their passions and gifts with what the world needs to help them choose a fulfilling career.

As students encounter a variety of subjects, teaching methods, and expert faculty mentors in various disciplines, they clarify their own personal values, interests, and talents. They begin to envision how they can discover meaningful purpose and create positive change in our world through a prosperous career. As that vision becomes clear, the supportive community at Loyola helps our students move from a state of exploration to one of execution.

Through the guidance of our active alumni network, faculty, and administrators like our Career Center staff, students prepare to articulate the value of their Loyola education and the immediate impact they can bring to an organization.

When an individual combines meaningful career discernment with Loyola’s exceptional academic experience, the resulting combination of purpose and competence is remarkable.

Our students and alumni are not just ready to face the challenges of today’s workplace; they are what we like to call “Loyola Ready.”

Jim Dickinson, Ph.D., ’01
Assistant Vice President, Career Services

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